Tag Archives: nerdy kids books

Stuff I like: nerdy books for kids

In all fairness, I wanted to shamelessly promote the hilarious not-children’s book my friend Chris-Rachael Oseland wrote called Counting With TeslaChris-Rachael was called a “criminal mastermind” by the INS, has been threatened by the Postmaster General, and is writing a Doctor Who cookbook. Her book also got me thinking how STEM, The Big Bang Theory, and all of those Marvel movies have elevated geek culture to the point where you can’t throw a stone on a college campus without hitting someone in a Doctor Who scarf. Which is awesome.

Geekiness will save us. It will cure cancer, make your smart phone project in 3D, and create more delicious foods for Trader Joe’s. In the name of these worthy goals, I offer the following nerdy books for your personal or library collection. Think of them as an investment in our future. Tell your boss they meet STEM goals. Or maybe even STEAM goals if you’re already there.  Or that these books could inspire the next Joss Whedon!

Mousetronaut by Mark Kelly: a partially true story that dares kids to keep dreaming about going into outer space.

Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin: salsa and dragons do not mix! Ok, so this is fantasy, not science. But you get the importance of dragons in geek culture.

There’s No Place Like Space by Tish Rabe: Seuss characters take you on a journey to the EIGHT planets. Which is illegal in Illinois. Seriously, you can never have enough space books for kids, in my opinion.

Aliens Love Underpants by Claire Freedman and Ben Cort: doesn’t the title say it all? I can already hear four-year olds howling with laughter.

My Little Geek ABC by Andrew and Sarah Spear: J is for Joystick. See, they’ll learn about ancient history, too!

StarWars ABC: Star Wars geeks are fruitfully multiplying and so their three-year olds DO know who Han Solo is.

The Space Child’s Mother Goose by Frederick Winsor: Mother Goose rewritten about math and science. You should be sold at this point.

Star Trek Book of Opposites
 by David Borgenicht, that guy who wrote THE WORST CASE SCENARIO SURVIVAL HANDBOOK: Wouldn’t you rather learn the diff between big and little from Kirk? Your kid would. Even they know Shatner’s awesome.

Dracula: A Babylit Counting Primer by Jennifer Adams: gorgeously illustrated, slightly spooky, and a jump-start for parents wanting their kids to be Romantic Poetry English professors.

Many thanks to Chris-Rachael herself for help in compiling this list.